Jaime Gomez MD

Gomez Cardiovascular Clinic

956-504-7121

Texas Coastal Professional Building 5700 N Expressway 77/83 Suite 303
 Brownsville, TX 78526-9785

Our Location


Gomez Cardiovascular Clinic
Texas Coastal Professional Building
5700 N Expressway 77/83 Suite 303
Brownsville, Texas 78526-9785
Phone: 956-504-7121

How to make Bulletproof Coffee

Bulletproof coffee is a drink that combines coffee, oil, and butter.  It is a creamy coffee served warm and looks similiar to a latte. 
 
  1. Using freshly ground coffee beans, brew 1 cup of coffee, using a French press.
  2. Add 1 tablespoon (tbsp) of a medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil, which usually derives from coconut oil.
  3. Add 1 to 2 tbsp of grass-fed, unsalted butter or a non-dairy alternative
  4. Mix in a blender for 20 to 30 seconds.

Healthy Reading

Carnivore Diet

https://highintensityhealth.com/why-carnivore-diet-works-w-paul-saladino-md/

The Complete Guide to Fasting


Thousands of books have been written about the latest and greatest diets that will help people lose weight and improve health.  But a key element in any successful nutritional health program is a tried-and-true method that most people haven't thought about.  This ancient sectret is fasting.  In the Complete Guide to Fasting, Dr. Jason Fung has teamed up with international bestselling author and veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore to explain what fasting is really about, why its so important, and how to fast in a way that improves health.  
https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Guide-Fasting-Intermittent-Alternate-Day/dp/1628600012
 

What The Heck Should I Eat?

#1 New York Times bestselling author. Mark H. Hyman, MD sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat.  Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn't a healthy way to start your day? That milk doesn't build bones, and eggs aren't the devil?  Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose weight, stay fit, and improve our health. And who can blame us? When it comes to diet, there's so much changing and conflicting information flying around that it's impossible to know where to look for sound advice.  Decades of misguided "common sense", food-industry lobbying, bad science, and corrupt food policies and guildelines have only deepened our crisis of nutrional confusion, leaving us overwhelmed and anxious when we head to the grocery store.  Dr. Hayman is here to set the record straight.  He takes a close look at every food group and explains what we've gotten wrong, revealing which foods nurture our health and which pose a threat.  From grains to legumes, meat dairy, fats to artificial sweetners, and beyond.  He also explains food's role as powerful medicine capable of reversing chronic disease and shows how our food system and policies impact enviromnent, the economy, social justice, and personal health, painting a holistic picture of growing, cooking, and eating food in ways that nourish our bodies and the earth while creating a healthy society.  With myth-busting insights, easy-to-understand science, and delicious, wholesome recipes.  This is a no-nonsense guide to achieving optimal weight and lifelong health. 
https://www.amazon.com/Food-What-Heck-Should-Eat/dp/0316338869
 

The Plant Paradox

The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease
and Weight Gain by MD Gundry Steven R.

 

"I read this book... it worked. My autoimmune disease is gone and I'm 3o pounds lighter in my pleather." --Dr. Jaime Gomez

Most of us have heard of gluten—a protein found in wheat that causes widespread inflammation in the body. Americans spend billions of dollars on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health. But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem? In The Plant Paradox, renowned cardiologist Dr. Steven Gundry reveals that gluten is just one variety of a common, and highly toxic, plant-based protein called lectin. Lectins are found not only in grains like wheat but also in the “gluten-free” foods most of us commonly regard as healthy, including many fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and conventional dairy products. These proteins, which are found in the seeds, grains, skins, rinds, and leaves of plants, are designed by nature to protect them from predators (including humans). Once ingested, they incite a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions.

At his waitlist-only clinics in California, Dr. Gundry has successfully treated tens of thousands of patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases with a protocol that detoxes the cells, repairs the gut, and nourishes the body. Now, in The Plant Paradox, he shares this clinically proven program with readers around the world.

The simple (and daunting) fact is, lectins are everywhere. Thankfully, Dr. Gundry offers simple hacks we easily can employ to avoid them, including:

  • Peel your veggies. Most of the lectins are contained in the skin and seeds of plants; simply peeling and de-seeding vegetables (like tomatoes and peppers) reduces their lectin content.

  • Shop for fruit in season. Fruit contain fewer lectins when ripe, so eating apples, berries, and other lectin-containing fruits at the peak of ripeness helps minimize your lectin consumption.

  • Swap your brown rice for white. Whole grains and seeds with hard outer coatings are designed by nature to cause digestive distress—and are full of lectins.

With a full list of lectin-containing foods and simple substitutes for each, a step-by-step detox and eating plan, and delicious lectin-free recipes, The Plant Paradox illuminates the hidden dangers lurking in your salad bowl—and shows you how to eat whole foods in a whole new way.
https://www.amazon.com/Plant-Paradox-Dangers-Healthy-Disease/dp/006242713X







   
 

Angina

Angina is chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart, as a result of coronary heart disease. When plaque forms on the inner walls of the coronary arteries, blood flow is slowed. As this plaque builds, the heart must work harder to ensure blood flow. This buildup of plaque, known as atherosclerosis, causes the heart to gradually become oxygen-starved, producing pain in the surrounding tissue. Angina may feel like pressure or a squeezing pain in the chest and is often associated with a range of other symptoms, including shortness of breath, dizziness sweating, nausea, and fatigue. ...


Read More...
 

Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular or too-rapid beating (contraction) of the heart's upper chambers (atria) that affects the movement of blood into the heart's lower chambers (ventricles). It can lead to stroke or heart failure. When the movement of blood is irregular, blood may pool and form a clot; if a clot breaks off and travels to an artery leading to the brain, stroke can result. When the heart is incapable of pumping the amount of blood required to meet the body's needs, heart failure can result. Atrial fibrillation affects more than 2.7 million people in the United States, and often requires medical intervention. ...


Read More...
 

Balloon Valvuloplasty

A balloon valvuloplasty is a surgical procedure used to correct pulmonary valve stenosis. Pulmonary valve stenosis is a condition that slows the blood flow from the heart to the lungs as a result of narrowed heart valves. Stenosis, or narrowing, occurs when the valve cannot open wide enough and results in less blood flow to the lungs. An alternative to open heart surgery, balloon valvuloplasty relieves the valve obstruction and allows blood to flow properly through the valve. Many cases of pulmonary valve stenosis are mild and do not cause symptoms. However when the condition is severe, symptoms may be serious and treatment is necessary. ...


Read More...
 

Cardiac Ablation

Cardiac ablation is a procedure performed to treat arrhythmia, an abnormal heart rhythm. The cardiac ablation procedure uses small wires, called electrodes, that are placed inside the heart to measure electrical activity. Cardiac ablation helps to prevent abnormal electrical signals from traveling through the heart, which can stop an arrhythmia. These electrodes may also be used to scar or destroy tissue in the heart that triggers an abnormal heart rhythm. Cardiac ablation is often used to treat certain heart rhythm problems that have not responded to medication or other forms of treatment. ...


Read More...
 

Cardiac Pacemaker Implantation

A cardiac pacemaker is a device that is implanted under the skin to help control an individual's heart beat. This device is often used in people who have an arrhythmia, or abnormal heart beat, or in people whose heart beats too fast or too slow. A cardiac pacemaker sends signals to the heart that help it to beat at the correct and healthy pace. A cardiac pacemaker helps to track the heartbeat and maintain an adequate heart beat frequency to allow oxygen and nutrients to flow through the body. ...


Read More...
 

Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), also known as biventricular pacing, is a relatively new approach to tackling the problem of heart arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). CRT involves implanting a pacemaker to normalize heart rhythm, and alleviate symptoms associated with arrhythmia. It differs from other therapies using pacemakers by addressing the fact that, in approximately 30 percent of heart failure patients, the ventricles do not pump blood at precisely the same time. This lack of synchronicity results in decreased efficiency of blood flow. ...


Read More...
 

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is a disease that causes the heart muscle to become enlarged, thick or rigid. This condition makes it difficult for the heart to pump blood to the rest of the body. Cardiomyopathy can be caused by a number of different factors, which may produce different symptoms and require different treatments. Although it can be a serious condition that may lead to life-threatening complications, many cases of cardiomyopathy can be effectively treated to reduce symptoms and damage. ...


Read More...
 

Cardiovascular Disease

The cardiovascular system consists of the heart, blood vessels, and the blood that is circulated throughout these vessels. The cardiovascular system is powered by the heart and it is responsible for transporting oxygen, nutrients, and hormones throughout the body. When there is a breakdown or deficiency in the circulatory system, it is often referred to as cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease includes many different conditions that affect the cardiovascular system. Plaque may build up, narrowing the coronary arteries, and decrease blood flow to the heart. Blood clots may form within blood vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. In some cases, cardiovascular disease cannot be prevented. However, it can often be initially treated with healthy life style modifications. ...


Read More...
 

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure (CHF) occurs when the heart muscle, whether from weakness or stiffening, does not pump with sufficient force to circulate the blood properly. As a result, blood backs up in other parts of the body, such as the liver, abdomen, lower legs and lungs, because the heart is unable to keep pace with the body's circulatory needs. Although CHF can occur on either side of the body, it usually begins on the left, where the left ventricle, the primary pumping chamber of the heart, is located. ...


Read More...
 

Coronary Angioplasty

A coronary angioplasty is a procedure performed to improve blood flow, by re-opening or enlarging blocked arteries, in the heart. The blockages usually develop as a result of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis occurs when plaque builds up on the inner walls of the arteries and causes them to harden and narrow, often leading to coronary artery disease. A coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a tiny balloon that is inflated to open and widen the artery. It is often combined with the insertion of a small wire tube, called a stent, that helps keep the artery open. ...


Read More...
 

Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

Coronary artery disease is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart become narrowed and hardened. Typically, this condition is caused by the build up of plaque and fat on artery walls, which narrows the vessels that connect to the heart. This narrowing of the arteries restricts blood from reaching the heart, and proper circulation of blood and oxygen is not provided to the heart and its surrounding tissue. Blood clots can also form and completely block the artery. Coronary artery disease develops gradually and can eventually lead to a heart attack or heart failure. ...


Read More...
 

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is a buildup of fatty deposits in the coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart. This buildup of fat, cholesterol and calcium, known collectively as plaque, can cause a hardening and narrowing of the arteries that restricts blood from reaching the heart. Blood clots can also form and completely block the artery. Coronary artery disease develops gradually, and can eventually lead to a heart attack or heart failure. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women. ...


Read More...
 

Coronary Computed Tomography Angiogram

A coronary computed tomography angiogram, also known as a coronary CTA, is a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure used to detect a buildup of fat or calcium within the coronary arteries, the arteries that supply blood to the heart. Through images produced with contrast dye, the coronary CTA examines the blood vessels of the body to help identify any abnormalities. ...


Read More...
 

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...
 

Heart Arrhythmia

An arrhythmia is an irregular or abnormal heartbeat. A heart arrhythmia may occur when the electrical impulses that control the beating of the heart do not work properly, causing the heart to beat too slowly, too rapidly, or irregularly. While most arrhythmias are harmless, they may be an indication of a serious underlying condition, such as heart disease or a lack of blood flow to the heart. Heart arrhythmias are not uncommon and may be congenital or caused by various factors. ...


Read More...
 

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that deliver blood to the heart, are suddenly blocked and cannot supply the heart with blood and oxygen. This blockage causes damage and gradual death of the heart muscle and often requires immediate treatment in order to save the person's life. Also known as a myocardial infarction, heart attacks most often occur as a result of coronary artery disease, a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries. Heart attacks are the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. ...


Read More...
 

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, occurs when the pressure of the blood flowing against the artery walls is above the normal range. Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood the heart pumps and the blood flow resistance in the arteries. If the heart pumps more blood than normal, and the arteries are narrower than normal, the result is high blood pressure. Untreated high blood pressure can cause serious health problems, including heart attack, kidney failure and stroke. There are two types of high blood pressure: primary and secondary. Primary hypertension is high blood pressure that develops gradually over the course of time, and secondary hypertension is high blood pressure that results from an underlying medical condition. ...


Read More...
 

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is produced by the liver, the intestines and nearly all tissues in the body. Cholesterol is needed for the production of hormones, vitamin D, and the bile necessary to digest fats in food. Cholesterol also protects cell membranes from changes in temperature. Although a certain amount of cholesterol is needed, too much is unhealthy. An excessive amount of cholesterol can block blood flow in the arteries, which can lead to a stroke. High cholesterol does not have symptoms, but a simple blood test can determine its presence. Cholesterol levels can be controlled or reduced with an active and healthy lifestyle, although, in some cases, medication will be necessary. ...


Read More...
 

Holter Monitoring

A Holter monitor is a small, portable device that continuously records the heart's rhythms as well as the electrical activity of the heart. A Holter monitor may be used to capture information and check an individual's heart rhythm if results of other tests, such as an electrocardiogram (EKG), have been inconclusive. The monitor is worn for 24 to 48 hours during normal activity, and it it records the heart's electrical activity during that time period. ...


Read More...
 

Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is an electronic device that is implanted under the skin, and is used to detect an abnormal heartbeat. An ICD is often implanted in individuals with arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats). This device uses electrical impulses to control dangerous arrhythmias that may lead to heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest. If an abnormal heartbeat is detected, the ICD will deliver an internal electric shock to the heart, restoring a normal heart beat as needed. ...


Read More...
 

INR Testing

INR (international normalized ratio) testing measures the speed at which blood clots. It is commonly used to measure the clotting time of patients taking blood-thinning medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin) or heparin. The results of this test are given as a ratio. INR testing is performed to evaluate the patient's blood-clotting process to make sure it is in the normal range, and that the medication in question is preventing serious blood clots without causing dangerous bleeding. ...


Read More...
 

Mitral Valve Prolapse

Mitral valve prolapse occurs when one of the valves of the heart does not work properly. The mitral valve is the valve between the upper and lower left chambers of the heart. When this valve does not close properly, it causes a condition known as mitral valve prolapse. Mitral Valve prolapse often causes no symptoms and is usually not a serious condition. However, it may sometimes cause blood to flow backward into the upper left chamber or left atrium of the heart. This back flow of blood is referred to as mitral valve regurgitation. Most people are born with mitral valve prolapse and this condition is often hereditary. ...


Read More...
 

Pediatric Heart Murmur

A heart murmur is defined as an extra or unusual sound that is heard during a heartbeat, which is the sound made when blood flows into and out of the heart. It is not unusual for a child to have a heart murmur; in most cases, it is not an indicator of an underlying heart problem. Referred to as "innocent" or "functional," this type of murmur is heard only periodically, often goes away as a child gets older, and does not affect quality of life in any way. However, a problematic murmur, which is classified as abnormal, can be the result of a congenital heart defect (a structural defect present at birth). A heart murmur is graded, based on its intensity (loudness), on a scale of one to six. ...


Read More...
 

Stress Echocardiogram

A stress echocardiogram is a diagnostic test used to evaluate the strength of the heart muscle as it pumps blood throughout the body. Using ultrasound imaging, the stress echocardiogram detects and records any decrease in blood flow to the heart caused by narrowing of the coronary arteries. The test, which takes place in a medical center or in the doctor's office, is administered in two parts: resting and with exercise. In both cases, the patient's blood pressure and heart rate are measured so that heart functioning at rest and during exercise can be compared. The ultrasound images enable the doctor to see whether any sections of the heart muscle are malfunctioning due to a poor supply of blood or oxygen. ...


Read More...
 

Transient Ischemic Attack

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) occurs when the blood flow to the brain stops for a brief period of time. A TIA is a stroke-like event caused by improper blood flow in the carotid artery. The carotid artery is located in the neck and it carries blood from the heart to the brain. When blood flow is disrupted or blocked within these arteries, stroke-like symptoms may occur. Symptoms of a TIA are similar to those of a stroke, but they do not last as long, as the blockage within the artery may break-up or dissolve. In some individuals, a transient ischemic attack may be a warning sign that a stroke may occur in the future. ...


Read More...


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Angina

Angina is chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart, as a result of coronary heart disease. When plaque forms on the inner walls of the coronary arteries, blood flow is slowed. As this plaque builds, the heart must work harder to ensure blood flow. This buildup of plaque, known as atherosclerosis, causes the heart to gradually become oxygen-starved, producing pain in the surrounding tissue. Angina may feel like pressure or a squeezing pain in the chest and is often associated with a range of other symptoms, including shortness of breath, dizziness sweating, nausea, and fatigue. ...


Read More...

Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular or too-rapid beating (contraction) of the heart's upper chambers (atria) that affects the movement of blood into the heart's lower chambers (ventricles). It can lead to stroke or heart failure. When the movement of blood is irregular, blood may pool and form a clot; if a clot breaks off and travels to an artery leading to the brain, stroke can result. When the heart is incapable of pumping the amount of blood required to meet the body's needs, heart failure can result. Atrial fibrillation affects more than 2.7 million people in the United States, and often requires medical intervention. ...


Read More...

Balloon Valvuloplasty

A balloon valvuloplasty is a surgical procedure used to correct pulmonary valve stenosis. Pulmonary valve stenosis is a condition that slows the blood flow from the heart to the lungs as a result of narrowed heart valves. Stenosis, or narrowing, occurs when the valve cannot open wide enough and results in less blood flow to the lungs. An alternative to open heart surgery, balloon valvuloplasty relieves the valve obstruction and allows blood to flow properly through the valve. Many cases of pulmonary valve stenosis are mild and do not cause symptoms. However when the condition is severe, symptoms may be serious and treatment is necessary. ...


Read More...

Cardiac Ablation

Cardiac ablation is a procedure performed to treat arrhythmia, an abnormal heart rhythm. The cardiac ablation procedure uses small wires, called electrodes, that are placed inside the heart to measure electrical activity. Cardiac ablation helps to prevent abnormal electrical signals from traveling through the heart, which can stop an arrhythmia. These electrodes may also be used to scar or destroy tissue in the heart that triggers an abnormal heart rhythm. Cardiac ablation is often used to treat certain heart rhythm problems that have not responded to medication or other forms of treatment. ...


Read More...

Cardiac Pacemaker Implantation

A cardiac pacemaker is a device that is implanted under the skin to help control an individual's heart beat. This device is often used in people who have an arrhythmia, or abnormal heart beat, or in people whose heart beats too fast or too slow. A cardiac pacemaker sends signals to the heart that help it to beat at the correct and healthy pace. A cardiac pacemaker helps to track the heartbeat and maintain an adequate heart beat frequency to allow oxygen and nutrients to flow through the body. ...


Read More...

Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), also known as biventricular pacing, is a relatively new approach to tackling the problem of heart arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). CRT involves implanting a pacemaker to normalize heart rhythm, and alleviate symptoms associated with arrhythmia. It differs from other therapies using pacemakers by addressing the fact that, in approximately 30 percent of heart failure patients, the ventricles do not pump blood at precisely the same time. This lack of synchronicity results in decreased efficiency of blood flow. ...


Read More...

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is a disease that causes the heart muscle to become enlarged, thick or rigid. This condition makes it difficult for the heart to pump blood to the rest of the body. Cardiomyopathy can be caused by a number of different factors, which may produce different symptoms and require different treatments. Although it can be a serious condition that may lead to life-threatening complications, many cases of cardiomyopathy can be effectively treated to reduce symptoms and damage. ...


Read More...

Cardiovascular Disease

The cardiovascular system consists of the heart, blood vessels, and the blood that is circulated throughout these vessels. The cardiovascular system is powered by the heart and it is responsible for transporting oxygen, nutrients, and hormones throughout the body. When there is a breakdown or deficiency in the circulatory system, it is often referred to as cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease includes many different conditions that affect the cardiovascular system. Plaque may build up, narrowing the coronary arteries, and decrease blood flow to the heart. Blood clots may form within blood vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. In some cases, cardiovascular disease cannot be prevented. However, it can often be initially treated with healthy life style modifications. ...


Read More...

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure (CHF) occurs when the heart muscle, whether from weakness or stiffening, does not pump with sufficient force to circulate the blood properly. As a result, blood backs up in other parts of the body, such as the liver, abdomen, lower legs and lungs, because the heart is unable to keep pace with the body's circulatory needs. Although CHF can occur on either side of the body, it usually begins on the left, where the left ventricle, the primary pumping chamber of the heart, is located. ...


Read More...

Coronary Angioplasty

A coronary angioplasty is a procedure performed to improve blood flow, by re-opening or enlarging blocked arteries, in the heart. The blockages usually develop as a result of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis occurs when plaque builds up on the inner walls of the arteries and causes them to harden and narrow, often leading to coronary artery disease. A coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a tiny balloon that is inflated to open and widen the artery. It is often combined with the insertion of a small wire tube, called a stent, that helps keep the artery open. ...


Read More...

Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

Coronary artery disease is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart become narrowed and hardened. Typically, this condition is caused by the build up of plaque and fat on artery walls, which narrows the vessels that connect to the heart. This narrowing of the arteries restricts blood from reaching the heart, and proper circulation of blood and oxygen is not provided to the heart and its surrounding tissue. Blood clots can also form and completely block the artery. Coronary artery disease develops gradually and can eventually lead to a heart attack or heart failure. ...


Read More...

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is a buildup of fatty deposits in the coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart. This buildup of fat, cholesterol and calcium, known collectively as plaque, can cause a hardening and narrowing of the arteries that restricts blood from reaching the heart. Blood clots can also form and completely block the artery. Coronary artery disease develops gradually, and can eventually lead to a heart attack or heart failure. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women. ...


Read More...

Coronary Computed Tomography Angiogram

A coronary computed tomography angiogram, also known as a coronary CTA, is a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure used to detect a buildup of fat or calcium within the coronary arteries, the arteries that supply blood to the heart. Through images produced with contrast dye, the coronary CTA examines the blood vessels of the body to help identify any abnormalities. ...


Read More...

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...

Heart Arrhythmia

An arrhythmia is an irregular or abnormal heartbeat. A heart arrhythmia may occur when the electrical impulses that control the beating of the heart do not work properly, causing the heart to beat too slowly, too rapidly, or irregularly. While most arrhythmias are harmless, they may be an indication of a serious underlying condition, such as heart disease or a lack of blood flow to the heart. Heart arrhythmias are not uncommon and may be congenital or caused by various factors. ...


Read More...

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that deliver blood to the heart, are suddenly blocked and cannot supply the heart with blood and oxygen. This blockage causes damage and gradual death of the heart muscle and often requires immediate treatment in order to save the person's life. Also known as a myocardial infarction, heart attacks most often occur as a result of coronary artery disease, a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries. Heart attacks are the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. ...


Read More...

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, occurs when the pressure of the blood flowing against the artery walls is above the normal range. Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood the heart pumps and the blood flow resistance in the arteries. If the heart pumps more blood than normal, and the arteries are narrower than normal, the result is high blood pressure. Untreated high blood pressure can cause serious health problems, including heart attack, kidney failure and stroke. There are two types of high blood pressure: primary and secondary. Primary hypertension is high blood pressure that develops gradually over the course of time, and secondary hypertension is high blood pressure that results from an underlying medical condition. ...


Read More...

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is produced by the liver, the intestines and nearly all tissues in the body. Cholesterol is needed for the production of hormones, vitamin D, and the bile necessary to digest fats in food. Cholesterol also protects cell membranes from changes in temperature. Although a certain amount of cholesterol is needed, too much is unhealthy. An excessive amount of cholesterol can block blood flow in the arteries, which can lead to a stroke. High cholesterol does not have symptoms, but a simple blood test can determine its presence. Cholesterol levels can be controlled or reduced with an active and healthy lifestyle, although, in some cases, medication will be necessary. ...


Read More...

Holter Monitoring

A Holter monitor is a small, portable device that continuously records the heart's rhythms as well as the electrical activity of the heart. A Holter monitor may be used to capture information and check an individual's heart rhythm if results of other tests, such as an electrocardiogram (EKG), have been inconclusive. The monitor is worn for 24 to 48 hours during normal activity, and it it records the heart's electrical activity during that time period. ...


Read More...

Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is an electronic device that is implanted under the skin, and is used to detect an abnormal heartbeat. An ICD is often implanted in individuals with arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats). This device uses electrical impulses to control dangerous arrhythmias that may lead to heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest. If an abnormal heartbeat is detected, the ICD will deliver an internal electric shock to the heart, restoring a normal heart beat as needed. ...


Read More...

INR Testing

INR (international normalized ratio) testing measures the speed at which blood clots. It is commonly used to measure the clotting time of patients taking blood-thinning medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin) or heparin. The results of this test are given as a ratio. INR testing is performed to evaluate the patient's blood-clotting process to make sure it is in the normal range, and that the medication in question is preventing serious blood clots without causing dangerous bleeding. ...


Read More...

Mitral Valve Prolapse

Mitral valve prolapse occurs when one of the valves of the heart does not work properly. The mitral valve is the valve between the upper and lower left chambers of the heart. When this valve does not close properly, it causes a condition known as mitral valve prolapse. Mitral Valve prolapse often causes no symptoms and is usually not a serious condition. However, it may sometimes cause blood to flow backward into the upper left chamber or left atrium of the heart. This back flow of blood is referred to as mitral valve regurgitation. Most people are born with mitral valve prolapse and this condition is often hereditary. ...


Read More...

Pediatric Heart Murmur

A heart murmur is defined as an extra or unusual sound that is heard during a heartbeat, which is the sound made when blood flows into and out of the heart. It is not unusual for a child to have a heart murmur; in most cases, it is not an indicator of an underlying heart problem. Referred to as "innocent" or "functional," this type of murmur is heard only periodically, often goes away as a child gets older, and does not affect quality of life in any way. However, a problematic murmur, which is classified as abnormal, can be the result of a congenital heart defect (a structural defect present at birth). A heart murmur is graded, based on its intensity (loudness), on a scale of one to six. ...


Read More...

Stress Echocardiogram

A stress echocardiogram is a diagnostic test used to evaluate the strength of the heart muscle as it pumps blood throughout the body. Using ultrasound imaging, the stress echocardiogram detects and records any decrease in blood flow to the heart caused by narrowing of the coronary arteries. The test, which takes place in a medical center or in the doctor's office, is administered in two parts: resting and with exercise. In both cases, the patient's blood pressure and heart rate are measured so that heart functioning at rest and during exercise can be compared. The ultrasound images enable the doctor to see whether any sections of the heart muscle are malfunctioning due to a poor supply of blood or oxygen. ...


Read More...

Transient Ischemic Attack

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) occurs when the blood flow to the brain stops for a brief period of time. A TIA is a stroke-like event caused by improper blood flow in the carotid artery. The carotid artery is located in the neck and it carries blood from the heart to the brain. When blood flow is disrupted or blocked within these arteries, stroke-like symptoms may occur. Symptoms of a TIA are similar to those of a stroke, but they do not last as long, as the blockage within the artery may break-up or dissolve. In some individuals, a transient ischemic attack may be a warning sign that a stroke may occur in the future. ...


Read More...